Lawrence Klein

2017년 3월 5일 | By gosok | 0 Comments

Lawrence Klein

Born
(1920-09-14)September 14, 1920
Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.

Died
October 20, 2013(2013-10-20) (aged 93)
Gladwyne, Pennsylvania, U.S.

Nationality
United States

Institution
Univ. of Pennsylvania
University of Oxford
University of Michigan
NBER
Cowles Commission

Field
Macroeconomics
Econometrics

School or
tradition
Neo-Keynesian economics

Alma mater
MIT (Ph.D.)
UC Berkeley (B.A.)

Doctoral
advisor
Paul Samuelson

Doctoral
students
Arthur Goldberger
E. Roy Weintraub

Influences
Jan Tinbergen

Contributions
Macroeconometric forecasting models

Awards
John Bates Clark Medal (1959)
Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (1980)

Information at IDEAS / RePEc

Lawrence Robert Klein (September 14, 1920 – October 20, 2013) was an American economist. For his work in creating computer models to forecast economic trends in the field of econometrics in the Department of Economics at the University of Pennsylvania, he was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1980 specifically “for the creation of econometric models and their application to the analysis of economic fluctuations and economic policies.” Due to his efforts, such models have become widespread among economists. Harvard University professor Martin Feldstein told the Wall Street Journal that Klein “was the first to create the statistical models that embodied Keynesian economics,” tools still used by the Federal Reserve Bank and other central banks.[1]

Contents

1 Life and career

1.1 Early model-building
1.2 McCarthyism and move to England
1.3 Return to the U.S.
1.4 Brookings-SSRC Project
1.5 Wharton
1.6 Later career

2 Publications
3 See also
4 References
5 Further reading
6 External links

Life and career[edit]
Klein was born in Omaha, Nebraska, the son of Blanche (née Monheit) and Leo Byron Klein.[2] He went on to graduate from Los Angeles City College, where he learned calculus; the University of California, Berkeley, where he began his computer modeling and earned a B.A. in Economics in 1942; he earned his Ph.D. in Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1944, where he was Paul Samuelson’s first doctoral student.[3][4]
Early model-building[edit]
Klein then moved to the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics, which was then at the University of Chicago, now the Cowles Foundation. There he built a model of the United States economy to forecast the development of business fluctuations
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